Disappearing Roots
 

Disappearing Roots
Video and Sound -16:9 B/W 2.2-minute, 8 Light Box 8” X 10” X 2.5”, Laser cut on play wood replica 2’ X 1’ X 9” and 20 Pigment print 20” X 20” 7 Images, 30” X3 0” 8images, 12” X 12” 5 images, 2018-2019

Disappearing Roots considers the displacement of indigenous people in the hill tracts of Bangladesh. The Kaptai dam was built in 1962 as a hydropower source, and it produces about 5% of the total electricity consumed by Bangladesh. However, its creation displaced over 100,000 people (70% Chakma) and also submerged many homes, including the palace of the Chakma king which remains buried deep underneath a lake that is currently frequented by tourists. Globally over ten million people per year are displaced by World Bank development projects (dams and infrastructure projects). Through video and photography created through the artist’s long-term engagement with the hill tract communities, this work captures the remaining traces of ancient ways of life, highlighting the violence of gentrification and the trauma found in submerged symbols of cultural autonomy.